• Hotel exterior
  • Lobby
  • Guestroom
  • Ginza

The KEIKYU EX INN Higashiginza celebrated its grand opening on August 25, 2016.
Conveniently located just a three-minute walk from exit 5 at Higashiginza station on the Toei Asakusa Line or Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line for hassle-free access to the main tourist attractions of Tokyo as well as its business districts.
Every guest room features exclusive beds and pillows jointly designed with Simmons, known for supplying beds to Japan's luxury hotels. We also fit each room with a 2A USB outlet as well as air purification systems with humidifiers to ensure that our guests leave us happy, energetic, and eager to stay with us again.

2-15-15 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 Japan Access
E-MAIL
Check-in / Check-out
Check-in at 3:00 pm  / Check-out at 11:00 am
Note: Check-out times may vary depending on how the reservation was made.
Make a reservation



GuestroomsGuestrooms

Note: Rooms do not include breakfast

  • EX Semi-Double A/B A12m²・B12.5m² / Bed size : W140cm
    <Standard Rates> Single Occupancy 18,000yen / Double Occupancy 20,000yen
    EX Semi-Double A
    EX Semi-Double A
    EX Semi-Double B
    EX Semi-Double B

  • EX Semi-Double C 13.5m² / Bed size : W140cm
    <Standard Rates> Single Occupancy 18,500yen / Double Occupancy 20,500yen
    EX Semi-Double C
  • EXDX Double 18m² / Bed size : W160cm
    <Standard Rates> Single Occupancy 24,000yen / Double Occupancy 26,000yen
    EXDX Double
  • EXDX Twin 20m² / Bed size : W110cm
    <Standard Rates> Single Occupancy 25,000yen / Double Occupancy 27,000yen
    EXDX Twin
  • Universal Twin 24m² / Bed size : W110cm
    <Standard Rates> Single Occupancy 25,000yen / Double Occupancy 27,000yen
    Universal Twin

FacilitiesFacilities

Electric kettle
Refrigerator 40-inch LCD TV Free Wi-Fi
Air purifier humidifier Electric kettle An ion hair dryer
Mugs and glass cups Thermostatic temperature controlled shower Light-blocking curtains
MIWA card key access system Tablet PC
We also have a list of items for rent, including low resiliency pillows, pillows for reducing shoulder discomfort, mobile phone chargers, nail clippers, blankets, trouser press, irons, and umbrellas.
*Only a limited number of rental items are available. *Photos may not reflect the actual item available for rent.

AmenitiesAmenities

Amenities
Toothbrush set Body towel Towel
Shaving set Body soap Bath towel
Hair comb Shampoo Slippers
Hand soap Conditioner Pajama
Cottons, shower cap, cotton swabs, dental floss, shaving cream, bar soap, plus coffee, tea, haircare products, and mouthwash are available at the Front Desk.



BreakfastBreakfast

Guests who sign up for the breakfast plan will be served in the Excelsior Café on the first floor of the hotel. (If your plan does not include breakfast, you may purchase a meal ticket at the front desk for ¥650.)

Select from four breakfast options prepared especially for hotel guests.
Breakfast hours are 6:45 AM to 10:00 AM.

Special menu for hotel guests only

  • Risotto
    Risotto

Plus select one of the following options:

  • Ham and cheese sandwich plate
    Ham and cheese sandwich plate
  • Croissant sandwich plate
    Croissant sandwich plate
  • Croissant plate
    Croissant plate



AccessAccess


Guests within walking distance will find directions to the hotel by tapping the icon with smartphones or tablets.

Access


Kabukiza Theater

Kabukiza Theater

First built in 1889, the Kabukiza is the principal theater in Tokyo for traditional kabuki performances. Japanese theaters traditionally take on the name of the place or proprietor (as in the case of the Nakamuraza Theater), making the Kabukiza somewhat of an anomaly in that it is named after the major plays that take place there. The structure was rebuilt in 2013, and is now structurally a part of the Kabukiza Tower.

More information:
Visit website
Shinbashi Enbujo Theater

Shinbashi Enbujo Theater

The Shinbashi Enbujo Theater was originally constructed in 1925 to provide a venue for geisha dance performances, primarily by geisha associations from the Shimbashi area. It officially opened with performances by the Azuma Odori group, whose appearances are still a popular sign of spring in the Tokyo area. As Japan entered the Showa period (1926–1989), the theater was taken over by the Shochiku company. The new proprietors brought a variety of productions to the stage, ranging from kabuki and modern shinpa plays to Shochiku comedies and productions from the Shinkokugeki and Zenshinza troupes.

More information:
Visit website
Ginza shopping district (Mitsukoshi, Matsuya, Wako)

Ginza shopping district (Mitsukoshi, Matsuya, Wako)

The Ginza shopping district has been home to long-standing merchants since the old silver coin casters and publishing houses of the Edo government. The district is concentrated along Ginza-dori between the first to the eighth block (chome) of Ginza, with highlights that include Wako (a long-established luxury retailer specializing in high-end accessories), Mitsukoshi, Matsuya, and other department stores as well as premium boutiques that include international brands. Like Fifth Avenue in New York, the Ginza is internationally known as one of the world's most exclusive shopping destinations.

Tokyo Big Sight

Tokyo Big Sight

Tokyo Big Sight, officially known as the as Tokyo International Exhibition Center, is a convention center located in the Tokyo Waterfront City area. It hosts international trade fairs in the city as well as a variety of other events. It is also scheduled to be a venue for athletic events during the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Access:
Getting there: Take the Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line from Higashi-Ginza Station to Hatchobori Station. Change to the Keiyo Line and take it to Shin-Kiba Station. There, get on the Rinkai Line and take it to Kokusai-Tenjijo Station. The district is about a seven-minute walk from there.
More information:
Visit website
Hamarikyu Gardens

Hamarikyu Gardens

Hamarikyu Gardens is one of the renowned parks of the Edo period, and boasts two imperial wild duck preserves as well as Shiori Pond, which visitors can enjoy in many different states as it is linked to the sea and experiences the rise and fall of the tides. The southern garden was originally a villa for the Tokugawa shogunate families, and is separate from the northern garden built in the Meiji period and later (1868–1912). It has been nationally designated as a Special Place of Scenic Beauty and Historic Site as proof of its attractive views.

Tsukiji Hongan-ji Temple

Tsukiji Hongan-ji Temple

Tsukiji Hongan-ji was originally constructed as a branch of the Nishi-Hongan-ji Temple in Kyoto during the Edo period, but the main building was destroyed in a large fire during the 1650s. It was later rebuilt in its present location after reclaiming land in the Hatchōbori sea. In fact, the name of the region, Tsukiji, written with with the characters for construct and land, is said to point to this reclamation. Today, it is one of the most famous branch temples in Tokyo and the site of funerals for numerous distinguished persons.

Tokyo Skytree(R)

Tokyo Skytree®

Standing 634 meters high, Tokyo Skytree is the city's newest broadcasting tower built using Japan's most advanced technology. It offers visitors an unbroken view of the city and even a glimpse of Mt. Fuji on a clear day. The tower and surrounding areas also feature a planetarium, restaurants, and extensive array of shopping options, including special Skytree souvenirs that can only be found here.

Access:
Getting there: Take the Toei Asakusa Line from Higashi-Ginza Station to Oshiage Station/Skytree. The facility is about a one-minute walk from there.
More information:
Visit website
Imperial Theatre

Imperial Theatre

Located along the moat to the Imperial Palace, the Imperial Theater was Japan's first western-style theater venue, originated by famous industrialists like Masuda Taro and Shibusawa Eiichi. The theater hosts opera, kabuki, Shakespeare, musicals, and a variety of other performances. It's advertising catchphrase, "Today the Imperial Theatre, tomorrow Mitsukoshi" became part of the Japanese vocabulary, taking root as a symbol of the early days of the nation's consumer spending era.

Access:
Getting there: Take the Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line from Tsukiji Station and get off at Hibiya Station. The theater is about a four-minute walk from there.

Maihama

Maihama is famous as the site of Japan's most famous theme parks. The area is also home to restaurants, theaters, fashion boutiques, variety goods stores, and other shopping opportunities, making it a popular destination for all kinds of fun.

Access:
Getting there: Take the Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line from Higashi-Ginza Station or Tsukiji Station to Hatchobori Station. There, change to the Keiyo Line and take it to Maihama Station. (Minimum travel time from Higashi-Ginza Station is 25 minutes.)